Across the River and into the Trees

Across the River and into the Trees

3.33 (8,021 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

Richard Cantrell is an American colonel living in Venice just after the Second World War. The fighting has left him scarred and embittered, a middle-aged man with a heart condition. It seems that only the love of Renata, a nineteen-year-old countess can save him. But Cantrell is living in the shadow of war, every move he makes dictated by old battle instincts, and it is possible that for him the longed-for peace may have come too late.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 240 pages
  • 129 x 198 x 15mm | 170g
  • Vintage Classics
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 1784872032
  • 9781784872038
  • 49,219

Review Text

The most important author since Shakespeare
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Review quote

He can perform prodigies. He can fascinate us by pure evocation, by the tensity of the situation * Times Literary Supplement * The most important author since Shakespeare * New York Times *
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About Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway was born in 1899. His father was a doctor and he was the second of six children. Their home was at Oak Park, a Chicago suburb.

In 1917, Hemingway joined the Kansas City Star as a cub reporter. The following year, he volunteered as an ambulance driver on the Italian front, where he was badly wounded but decorated for his services. He returned to America in 1919, and married in 1921. In 1922, he reported on the Greco-Turkish war before resigning from journalism to devote himself to fiction. He settled in Paris where he renewed his earlier friendships with such fellow-American expatriates as Ezra Pound and Gertrude Stein. Their encouragement and criticism were to play a valuable part in the formation of his style.

Hemingway's first two published works were Three Stories and Ten Poems and In Our Time but it was the satirical novel, The Torrents of Spring, that established his name more widely. His international reputation was firmly secured by his next three books; Fiesta, Men Without Women and A Farewell to Arms.

He was passionately involved with bullfighting, big-game hunting and deep-sea fishing and his writing reflected this. He visited Spain during the Civil War and described his experiences in the bestseller, For Whom the Bell Tolls.

His direct and deceptively simple style of writing spawned generations of imitators but no equals. Recognition of his position in contemporary literature came in 1954 when he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, following the publication of The Old Man and the Sea. He died in 1961.
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Rating details

8,021 ratings
3.33 out of 5 stars
5 15% (1,186)
4 29% (2,292)
3 37% (2,932)
2 15% (1,234)
1 5% (377)
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